Welcome BloomFinder members!

This page provides high resolution satellite images of the south basin of Lake Winnipeg for this open water season. These images show where floating algae has become abundant in the last couple of days. If you are new to BloomFinder we suggest you review the 2018 archive. The archive will get you started on understanding the dynamics of the basin and help you to interpret the images.

Did you miss our sign-up? Please join if you wish to use our Facebook social media group where people like you upload photos and note the state of a beach you might be interested in on the day you plan to go.  Sign up and we'll send you an email invite to the BloomFinder social media group. We use Facebook to notify users when new satellite images are available.

Blooms in high resolution

This image, captured in 2017, is an example of a mid-summer bloom that also shows the different water masses pooling in the lake.

Not all days on the lake are this cloud free (or filled with algal blooms, thankfully).  Although the lake has blooms in the spring and fall fewer people see the cold water blooms. In this late summer image we see the south basin is sourced by water from the Red River Valley to the south via the Red River and from the Winnipeg River in the Precambrian Shield to the east. The pattern of muddy and dark water is a common, and variable, site in the basin that depends on the inflow of each river and how the wind and currents move the water masses. It is not uncommon to see algal blooms where nutrient rich turbid and relatively clear and well lit water masses mix. The wind can deposit algae high on beaches due to swell, or simply float to the surface during calm summer periods. Warmer lake temperatures also increase the potential for summer blooms of cyanobacteria. The cold water blooms are a different type of algae that do not float. Satellite data shows the surface and near surface conditions only.

This image is an example that shows the spatial variability of algae from not only from one side of the lake to the other, but also for beaches  <10 km apart.  The satellite images found here can be clicked on with your mouse and zoomed into the real satellite data using BloomFinders mapping service. We’ll add imagery to this page as the summer progresses. When zoomed in, it is even apparent that differences are apparent along Grand Beach.

August 14, 2017. Turbid, or muddy, water from the Red River moved north along the west shore. Meanwhile, the stained but slightly more clear water from the Winnipeg River pooled in Traverse Bay, and into the center of the South Basin of Lake Winnipeg. Click    here    for high resolution satellite image. Modified ESA data.

August 14, 2017. Turbid, or muddy, water from the Red River moved north along the west shore. Meanwhile, the stained but slightly more clear water from the Winnipeg River pooled in Traverse Bay, and into the center of the South Basin of Lake Winnipeg. Click here for high resolution satellite image. Modified ESA data.

 

July 15, 2019

July 15, 2019. Although partially cloud covered, offshore blooms are now developing and can be seen in this image over large areas but most notably on the east side of the lake south of the Manigotogan River where tea-stained water rich in dissolved organics enters the lake as plumes. Recently, the west side of the south basin has had better conditions for recreation when compared to the east beaches as an upwelling event has brought bottom water free of floating algae up onto the shore. This looks like darker water image pixels running along the shore as a band because the relatively clear water absorbs the suns light, and less returns to the satellite. We have great images of upwelling in our   2018 archive   on the west shore and in Traverse Bay. Also this relatively clear water shows sand waves visible in shallow water south of Willow Island. Zoom into the real satellite data on our website and see the shallow water sand waves just south of the lagoon at Gimli. Yes you can at times see the lake depth changes! Zoom into this satellite image by clicking here. Modified ESA data.

July 15, 2019. Although partially cloud covered, offshore blooms are now developing and can be seen in this image over large areas but most notably on the east side of the lake south of the Manigotogan River where tea-stained water rich in dissolved organics enters the lake as plumes. Recently, the west side of the south basin has had better conditions for recreation when compared to the east beaches as an upwelling event has brought bottom water free of floating algae up onto the shore. This looks like darker water image pixels running along the shore as a band because the relatively clear water absorbs the suns light, and less returns to the satellite. We have great images of upwelling in our 2018 archive on the west shore and in Traverse Bay. Also this relatively clear water shows sand waves visible in shallow water south of Willow Island. Zoom into the real satellite data on our website and see the shallow water sand waves just south of the lagoon at Gimli. Yes you can at times see the lake depth changes! Zoom into this satellite image by clicking here. Modified ESA data.

July 10, 2019

July 10, 2019. Algal blooms are beginning to be visible in the offshore zone of the south basin (in the source imagery which is harder to see in this graphic). Blooms are starting to show also in the nearshore areas by Victoria Beach, Hillside Beach, Grand Beach, and Patricia Beach. The west shore lacks these starter blooms. The lagoon at Grand Beach, which is often used for watersports, is starting to show algal growth as well. Click    here    to see the full resolution satellite image. Modified ESA data.

July 10, 2019. Algal blooms are beginning to be visible in the offshore zone of the south basin (in the source imagery which is harder to see in this graphic). Blooms are starting to show also in the nearshore areas by Victoria Beach, Hillside Beach, Grand Beach, and Patricia Beach. The west shore lacks these starter blooms. The lagoon at Grand Beach, which is often used for watersports, is starting to show algal growth as well. Click here to see the full resolution satellite image. Modified ESA data.

June 30, 2019

June 30, 2019. The offshore zone continues to hold less suspended sediment, algal blooms in some lagoons affect local beaches temporarily, and offshore blooms start to become visible to the satellite. Click    here    to see the satellite imagery. Modified ESA data.

June 30, 2019. The offshore zone continues to hold less suspended sediment, algal blooms in some lagoons affect local beaches temporarily, and offshore blooms start to become visible to the satellite. Click here to see the satellite imagery. Modified ESA data.

June 30, 2019.

A clear warm day with West/Southwest winds. This image shows three main patterns in the south basin.

The offshore zone with dark pixels shows relatively clear water. Clear water has less suspended material to reflect sunlight, so it appears dark to the satellite. The offshore zone of relatively clear water occurs most springs and into summer before the lake is fully mixed. The brightest lake image pixels occur north and west of Hecla Island where these shallow bays easily resuspend bottom sediment from wind action. Some of these sediments can be seen tracking south past the Hecla Island golf course before being entrained into eastward moving flows south of Black Island. These visually bright suspended sediments, and those east of Victoria Beach and Elk Island, have drifted away from shore. The previous days winds were from the east and stirred up the bottom in the shallows. A shift to westerlies before this image was captured spread the sediments to the east. The pattern of sediments evident in these images often results from weather from the past few days.

Algal blooms are starting. Offshore blooms are still rare but are visible NW of Patricia Beach. Nearshore algal blooms are evident in localized areas in and near lagoons at Hillside Beach, Patricia Beach, and Gimli. Each of these lagoons warms earlier and receives nutrients from the lake. Interestingly, the lagoon at Grand Beach has been land-locked this year and has only pooled water from upstream. This lagoon, like the one on Elk Island, does not appear to have pronounced algae. Algae was a problem for boaters and skiers here last year. This area is used for boating recreation as the lake is seldom calm. Last year there was more local rain and the outflow of the lagoon at Grand Beach was breached. Years with higher rains or water levels help the ebb-and-flow of water to occur. Water levels have been low since August of 2017.

 Algal blooms are apparent in the Red River delta. Like some lagoons, algae transport away from these water bodies and affect nearby beaches. Remember, in wetlands not all things green in a satellite image are algae.  However, complex water movements that carry blooms reveal the tell-tale signs. Blooms that entered the lake near the Red River can be seen spreading along the shore to the east past the Brokenhead River, as well as to the west of the Red River.

 Use our mapping service to zoom into the native resolution satellite image. Have a detailed look at the water mass patterns in the Red River Delta – they tell a story.

June 25, 2019

June 25, 2019. A typical late spring/early summer image of the south basin. Modified ESA data.

June 25, 2019. A typical late spring/early summer image of the south basin. Modified ESA data.

June 25, 2019

The south basin remains mainly turbid (muddy) but small blooms have been reported. Some are evident in this image, like that of the lagoon near Willow Island on the west shore. Spotty cloud cover and the cloud shadows are visible. In this image the darker water pixels infer slightly higher surface water clarity as clear water absorbs sunlight and so less reflects back to the satellite. The offshore zone of relatively clear water west of Elk Island extends to Hecla and Black Islands. This is common in spring and early summer. The offshore zone is distant from sources of sediment from rivers and that resuspended by waves in the shallows. The more muddy the water the brighter it looks in the image. The bright bays west and north of Hecla Isl. are shallow and resuspend sediments often due to wind. The image to the south where the Red River inflows was mainly cloudy and was not uploaded. However, the plume is visible moving north on the west side of the basin up to Gimli. Modified ESA data.

 

July 5 2019

July 5 2019. All clear (in most areas)! The small algal blooms evident in the last image in and near lagoons have subsided as water movements in-and-out have increased with winds and mixing. Some local blooms persist in the area of the Brokenhead River and near Patricia Beach. Winds resuspended sediments along the clay shores and shallow flats on the east side of Traverse Bay. Modified ESA data.

July 5 2019. All clear (in most areas)! The small algal blooms evident in the last image in and near lagoons have subsided as water movements in-and-out have increased with winds and mixing. Some local blooms persist in the area of the Brokenhead River and near Patricia Beach. Winds resuspended sediments along the clay shores and shallow flats on the east side of Traverse Bay. Modified ESA data.